WIP Wednesday #6: Zero draft DONE

Work in Progress

Ever watch an author finish writing his book?

Watch Literally writing the last pages of my novel. from RandalEldonGreene on www.twitch.tv

If you clicked my video above, now you have. 

Finishing the book took me a bit longer than I expected. Buying a new house, moving in mid-October, setting up the office, and learning how to begin “professional” livestreaming all took time away from actual writing. But actually write I did, and the book was finished yesterday.

writing with pen

My novel technically began in early 2007, as an idea. It had a lengthy seven-year gestation period before the first words of the book were born. I actually started writing it around September of 2014. So it’s been five years in the making, around twelve years total from concept to paper-draft completion. In time since writing began I got a girlfriend, moved into a rental house, got married, wrote a short story collection, became a first time home buyer, had something like 24 short creative pieces published, and saw my first novel printed by a small press.

decluttering desk

The plan today is to begin typing up my zero draft. First, I’m going to tidy up the chaotic mess that is my desk. I think there is such a thing as creative chaos, and the tendency towards this in my writing space seems to affirm it as a fact. But periodic cleaning is a good thing for focus. And a good time for decluttering is the start of a new chapter. This certainly counts as one for me.

I’m still making small adjustments to my process. This includes how and when I livestream my writing to how and when I work on what. For example, I’ve been putting off my dialogues for a long while now. The novel was imperative. And, truly, it still is. But I need to finish editing my collection of creative conversations sooner than later. What I think I will do is set aside certain hours of a specific day to focus on that and other short fiction projects.
webcam
Livestreaming itself has been an interesting experience. I feel like maybe I should move the livestream to YouTube where there is an existent community of authors and writers. I may attempt a trial of  this in the near future. I’d also like to try making some videos for AuthorTube and see how that goes.

As for livestreaming on Twitch, I’ve found that most Twitch people aren’t there to write, even if they want to hang on my stream. For this reason, my most popular streams have been ones where I’m chatting. Chatting while writing is, naturally, distracting. So I’m adjusting my schedule to make sure I consistently do silent writing streams and also give myself more hours of “private” writing sessions (you know, just regular writing, not in front of a camera). So some of my streams are going to be starting later to make sure my writing isn’t overly interrupted by social sessions. In other words, writing comes first; the stream is there to build community by encourage others and myself to keep at it.
whiksey
I’m also encouraging donations with a Whiskey Wednesday stream, where I’ll be imbibing a drink or two during the writing session. There’s a nicely placed whiskey fund tip jar for those willing to subscribe or donate to the cause of writing drunk and editing sober.

How long will this novel take to edit? That is simply something I cannot be sure of at this juncture. Hopefully less than a year. During the writing of this book, I’ve learned not only a lot about how I write, but how my body desires to write and desires to not write. I don’t experience writer’s block, but I do experience distraction, excuses, the easy pleasures the TV screen and of a book (“just one more chapter” becoming an all-morning read). So in the next phase of this novel, I’ll probably be learning a lot about how I edit something this lengthy. Certainly, I have ample experience editing short fiction, and even my first short novel, but this manuscript is sure to both test and teach me.

It’s a test and a learning experience I’m looking forward to.

firstdraft

Twitch it up this NaNoWriMo

Twitch it up this NaNoWriMo

Hey, bookworms, authors, and NaNoWriMo participants!

anime Girl sleeping with book over water (relaxing)

Whether or not you’ll actually be doing NaNoWriMo this month, sometimes having a writing partner is nice. Because of scheduling conflicts, lack of a local writing community, medical issues, or many other reasons, it’s not always possible to find those real life writing partners. One of the alternatives is an online writing community.

We have technology

I’m a huge fan of the YouTube author community (AKA AuthorTube). However, live writing sessions are spotty at best, even if there’s tons of quality entertainment, advice, and inspirational videos for writers. That’s why for many of my mornings these past months, I’ve been chatting live with writers on Twitch. The Twitch writing community is smaller (much smaller), but it’s been giving me something I’ve been wanting: writing partners.

Twitch VS YouTube

I’ve been enjoying it so much, that I spent this week learning how to livestream with Twitch. I took a lot of time before this to think about the Twitch writing community and ponder what I could bring to it. There are streamers who work with their chat to write a story together, streamers who put their screen up so viewers can see exactly what they’re working on, and others (my favorite kind) who chat and do writing sprints.

Writing Sprint

The one major concern I’ve had as I’ve joined in on livestreams is the same exact concern I have every time I’ve decided to boot up the computer while writing: distraction. But I found that the Twitch writing community is, by and large, motivating. Writers actually writing, authors discussing the writing process, book lovers talking about books, and people forming friendships and connections during livestreams have all helped grease my writing gears.

What’s been distracting is the noise.

Noise Noise Noise

By noise, I mean that when I’m really ready to get into it, I have to silence the screen (or at least turn the volume down really low because it’s not nice to mute a Twitch streamer since you won’t count as a viewer on that platform if you mute the stream, and view count is important for streamers). Noise is obviously not a problem for most people who are looking for writing livestreams. But for some (like me) I’m sure it is. I want the community and the company while I write. But I could do without the music many streamers play in the background, plus the auditory chatting from the streamer can become distracting.

While a chatty streamer works for a lot of writers, it doesn’t work for this author. Thus, why I put that volume scroll way down, almost at mute, after a while. But this got me thinking that maybe what I can give to the Twitch writing community is a silent writing stream.

white mute button

So I introduce to you, my Twitch channel. It’s not all silent. Just the middle hours are. There’s author talk time both before and after the writing session.

I’m super excited to see all the NaNoWriMo writers looking for a live (and streamable) writing community while they work on their books. And if you’re not a part of NaNo, that’s great too. I’m not participating myself this year; instead I’ll be finishing up the last sections of my novel-in-progress. So all writers are invited. I stream early mornings to early afternoons. The goal is to be online by 8am, Central Standard Time most Tuesdays through Fridays.

Let me know if you can make it to the stream and comment below with what you’re working on this November. Write on!

Randal Eldon Greene Twitch Stream