The Publisher Came to Me

Some things in life are luck and some things are perseverance and putting yourself out there. Some things are both, though not probably a 50/50 split. In fact, I don’t even like to think of the good things in life as being a ratio split between luck and effort, rather I like to believe that effort can lead you to lucky breaks that wouldn’t have otherwise been on your path had you not worked hard and been brave in the first place.

Right now I feel overwhelmed with luck. The masthead of Corona\Samizdat, Rick Harsch, reached out to me to ask if I had a book I’d like to publish with them. I told him YES and then promptly described my dialogue-only short story collection and emailed off links to some pieces from it published in zines. The thing is, I wasn’t actively even looking for a publisher. Only occasionally would I find myself working on one my dialogues, usually after I had heard about a themed anthology or magazine which one of my stories might go well with. I planned to wait until after I was finished editing my novel before working seriously on my dialogues. But then, the perfect publisher for this weird, little collection came knocking on my social media door.

How did I end up so lucky? I own . . . let me count them . . . eleven books published by this press (if I wasn’t on a book-buying ban without a gift card in hand, I’d own more). I adore Corona\Samizdat’s releases. Their covers are often enviable and trippy. They’re releasing some of the best experiments in literature bound in some of the most amazing cover art I’ve ever seen. So what in the world possessed Rick to reach out to me on the off chance I had a book just sitting around, unpublished or out of print? In short, how did I end up so lucky?

I’ve been on Instagram for over a year, but only this year have I really been figuring out how to properly use it (I don’t think I even owned a smart phone when I first signed up using a web browser; I intended to toy with advertising my Hello, Author interviews on the platform). It was on Instagram that I discovered Corona\Samizdat and began—as frugally as possible—buying their books. I followed them. They followed me back. I followed Rick. He followed me in turn. All the while, I began posting more bookish content.

It was on April 27th that I posted several photos of my office, the first one being a photo I took directly in front of the dusty TV screen I use as for my computer monitor when I’m editing. The accompanying text was this:

Me contemplating actually cleaning up the messy office which I haven’t really used for writing since December, as the Kanban board shows. Piles of paper litter the place, the desk is a wreck, and the book I’m writing increasingly wants the weight of the room lifted. It is an ideal writing space to boot.

We have finally found a new crew member at work, meaning that soon things should be normal. Normal for me means working only weekends and one evening a week. Normal also means I can try out a new writing routine. Since the baby was born less than 5 months ago, in December, I have been attempting to write while taking on the roll of full time dad. These past couple of weeks the baby has changed, is demanding more attention and thus more time. So I’m thinking now that I need to try writing later at night, after baby and wife are in bed. I think this may be my new way forward for writing.

It was the next day that Rick reached out to me asking if I had a book. It was pure luck . . . except for the parts that led up to the lucky break. Everything coalesced to put me on this path, from brute-force learning an app I find unintuitive and putting myself out there (shitty pictures and all) to denying myself small indulgences so I could comfortably buy a few extra books—it all led to Rick taking the time to read the words I wrote to accompany a weird selfie I snapped. It all led to my lucky break. I couldn’t have had this kind of luck without participating in the book and writing world of today’s social media. And I really couldn’t have have done it without Rick seeing my post and deciding to take a chance on me. So thank you, Rick.

I’m happy to announce that Dialogues: A Collection of Creative Conversations will be published at some unspecified time in the future by Corona\Samizdat. I’m working on edits. A couple of stories were inexplicably lost in the move from a rental to our house. I may also find that not all of the dialogues are actually salvageable in their current forms (and maybe even in their concepts). I know I’ll have at least 52 completed, but can’t say that all 52 will come from the 2018 self-imposed challenge of writing one story a week for a year using only dialogue. I feel incredibly lucky that I’ll be joining the Corona Crew—a group which includes Rick and all of the authors and illustrators he’s published through Corona\Samizdat. And hopefully the luck will keep coming as I get hard at work on this collection.

A meandering post on avoiding stagnation

Image source: Pixabay

DISASSOCIATION

It’s been a hot minute since I’ve felt like myself. I pinpoint this disassociation with my identity to when I got sick about three weeks ago. I’ve no idea why I didn’t just feel ill but also seemed to be standing beside myself, not quite able to make my actions align with the me I usually am. Writing suffered, reading became sluggish days on end, and my free time wasn’t always spent the way I would like. It seemed it wasn’t just my nose that was plugged, but my entire identity was suffering a sinus infection.

Last night my mind began to spark back to life. As I drove home from work shortly before midnight, glimmers of myself flashed in the dark. I am not fully aflame by any means, but the sparks have hit the kindling of my prefered mode of being — a mode I would love to say is my default self, but alas, I’ve cultivated the prefered me through hard work and must work harder still to continue with the endless journey away from stagnation. Nonetheless, while not burning yet bright, I can say sickness and disassociation recede by the minute.

WRITING UPDATE

The writer’s group I helped start and run has now had ahold of The Brick twice, so far scrutinizing parts of the first chapter. I’ve been asking for structural edits and have enjoyed the feedback. My special pleasure is in seeing the reactions of readers who haven’t read anything like my writing in this book. My expected pleasure is in hearing what my bestie, Mike, has to say about this book I’ve been writing with him in mind as my ideal audience.

Two unfortunate things have impacted the group: 1) Mike has been having to work Thursday nights when our group meets. He and I work at the same hotel, and we are in desperate need of another desk clerk. Right now it’s affecting us both, creating a situation where neither of us can have the same night off, and since I run the writing club, it’s I who gets Thursday evenings off. 2) The writer’s group has lost at least two people who found the group intimidating, as if we’re too professional for amateurs. This seems odd to me, as while three of us have put our work out there, we’re by no means acclaimed authors or even making a living at stacking words into book-shaped products. It is perhaps the very advice we dispense in our critique group that intimidates. That would be more understandable; I can see an unpublished writer feeling they have nothing of value to offer to the group . . . though I’d think having insightful readers would be a plus for amateur writers attending a critique group, not a negative. Whatever it is that’s made a couple of intimidated writers jump ship, in the future I hope to convey the need for input from all levels of readers and writers. After the first meeting, I purposefully left off mentioning my credentials as a writer and influencer in the writing community and did not notice any casual flaunting of C.V.s, so I am left guessing what it is about us regulars that feels intimidating to some of our newbies.

Writing with baby is sometimes tough, sometimes not. She doesn’t seem to have a consistent napping schedule, but doctors and baby books are suggesting that she should. If she did, it’d make writing a whole heck of a lot easier during the day. Her grumpy bouts haven’t helped matters; Cora really would rather be held facing out while I walk her around. That’s her favorite. The girl really needs to learn to crawl so she can explore the world herself — not that a baby on the go would make writing any easier!

Cora helping Daddy with laundry.

My goal is to write weekday evenings for a couple of hours no matter how well or poorly writing went during the day. However, because of our need for another desk clerk at work and scheduling oddities with a part-timer, I’ve been working at least two weekday evenings. Before this, I was working only weekends and often (but not always) one weekday evening. So my intentions aren’t matching up with my reality, though it’s no fault of my own.

READERS AND WRITERS NOVELTY HUB

I’ve been selling awesome, bookish merch on Amazon for a while, but I’ve decided to move my focus to a standalone store. To mitigate costs, I’ve kept it simple and without branding and logos. So head on over to Readers and Writers Novelty Hub to find something for yourself or the bookish caffeine addict in your life.

PROJECTS AND SELF-IMPROVEMENT

I alluded above and in my blog post The Paternal To-do of 2022 to what basically amounts to self-improvement. I’ve made some nice jabs at cultivating a lifestyle, but I’ve yet to make any strong stabs at escaping stagnation. To do this, I need to do more than cultivate my environment for the preferred me, but I need to push myself.

I grant, I’ve been learning to parent as a stay-at-home dad these past several months. And Cora herself is in continual flux, meaning I’m continually adjusting to her. So what I have been doing is laying the groundwork for pushing myself. This involves picking up some projects I’ve laid aside and heaving a few hefty self-improvement goals at myself. In the next couple of weeks, I’ll be going in 100%. For me, this is an all or nothing kind of deal. I want this life to be the best for me and my family, and this means not letting myself get stuck wanting and waiting to do certain things but actually setting the groundwork and then doing it. I’m quite happy with both the inner work and external work it’s taken to get me here, nearly ready to journey even further away from stagnation on that endless blooming path of potential.

Image source: Pixabay

WIP Wednesday #9: Alpha Readers

My friend Kristin asked me to volunteer as a leader for a new writer’s group through the local public library she works at. I readily agreed, and we developed a plan for a workshop-style critique group. I would really like to find a bunch of writers in the area with whom I can talk to about books and the craft of stringing words into tales, poetry, and other forms of creative meaning. This groups seems like a perfect way to both find writer friends and to improve my own writing along the way. What I didn’t expect was to be sharing my work with the group so soon.

At the end of the first meeting no one had anything to volunteer. I imagined that a few months down the line I’d have my own unpublished novel manuscript in decent enough shape to feel comfortable sharing it. However, everyone seemed like they would be a lot more comfortable if they first critiqued one of the group leaders pieces. And so, I let myself be the sacrificial writer whose manuscript these readers will have their first stab (sharp and pointy stabs I’m sure) at.

ACTUAL IMAGE OF ALPHA READER CRITIQUING MY NOVEL

Yes, I could have submitted any number of unpublished short stories I have moldering away in some inexplicably dusty digital folder. However, I want this group to give me feedback on my novel. I need feedback on my novel. So I sent them the first part of my WIP, and now I’m kind of thinking Oh god, what have I done?

While the piece certainly isn’t as polished as I’d like, that’s only because for most parts of my novel I am making structural edits. I’d really like to be at a line-editing phase right now, but there’s just too much story craft to attend to still. The varnishing stage of word working will have to come later. And these early Alpha Readers will help me test the strength of my structural edits.

CC from PixabayCDD20

I turned on my laptop, loaded up the prologue and first chapter of my novel, selecting a total of fifteen pages. And then I read that oh-so-familiar story. I read it with the intention of sharing it. In doing so, I realized just how fucking different it is than anything most of my Alpha Readers have probably ever read. I think what I’ve written is good. But I do some ballsy shit in those first fifteen pages. So I’m a little nervous because I have no idea how an unprepared reader will take this kind of prose. Of course, I’m not trying to say that I’ve done something so unique that no reader will have ever had an analogous experience to what these, my Alpha Readers, are about to experience. What I’m saying is, not all of my Alpha Readers will be expecting a book like this.

My bestie, Mike, is the one and only person in this group who I know for a fact is at all prepared for my WIP. Though I’m hoping even he’ll be a bit surprised. And maybe the other group members are equally versed in similar modern Literary Fiction. But after meeting the handful of local authors who attended, I strongly doubt that (and make no judgements about it either).

I simply don’t know how readers unfamiliar with books of the sort I’ve written are going to react. So it’s both a bit scary and a bit exciting to see varying levels of blindness when it comes to my Alpha Readers. My bestie is well-versed in the kind of tough books that you must learn how to read while you read it. My co-leader, Kristin, is aware of the potential difficult reading level I write at since she did read my last book (though that book’s difficulty was in its language rather than structure). My other readers, like I already mentioned, I can’t be sure what they’ve read. Though if what they said they write is indicative of their past reading experience, then they haven’t read anything like what I’ve written.

CC from Pixabaygeralt

There is an upside and a downside to having Alpha Readers reading blind to the very genre of my book (categorized best, I think, as genre Literary Fiction, subgenre Systems Novel).

We’ll start with the negative.
My Alpha Readers may not give good feedback because the structure is too unfamiliar to their expectation. They may find my narrative approach so jarring that they can’t offer feedback (will my readers be too busy asking “What is it?” to suggest “This part here would be stronger if . . .”?).

There are plenty of potential positives.
My Alpha Readers may find the novel fresh and original. Being they may not have expectations about my genre, they might be more accepting of how it is different from other Lit Fic Systems Novels. No matter their reaction, I’ll come away with a small sample of ways that the regular reading public will react to my book. By the time I’ve shared my whole novel, I might have expanded the reading world for someone.

Our next meeting is on Thursday night, so I’ll have some initial reactions to report back on the day after this post goes live. Hopefully everyone who came to the first meeting also attends the second. And I hope we get more people in attendance even if they won’t be reading the first pages of my book.


All images in this post hold a Creative Common license and were sourced from Pixabay. The image of the husky tearing apart a ball was sourced from JockeEkroth on Pixabay. 

NEW PUBLICATION – Bright Moon Over Lover’s Bridge

Image credit: tikaderjoyj – Pixaby

I forgot to make an individual blog post for when it came out, but my short story “Bright Moon Over Lover’s Bridge” has been published in the Anansi Archive Anthology, Vol. 1. You can currently read it online or purchase the book on Amazon.

This story was the first one I wrote after meeting my then future wife, Libby. I remember her thinking it was quite good. I also had a couple of rejection letters that praised its aesthetic, but they rejected it anyway. The one I remember clearly was a moon-themed anthology, and I think my piece turned out being very different than any of the others – more artsy and less hard genre. Like many of my favorite pieces of writing, this one took a while to find a home. And I’m happy to see it found a home both in print and online.

I’ve also been working with a friend at one of the local public libraries to create a new writing critique group. I’m really excited to not only read the work of others with a constructively critical eye (something that always invigorates me) but to also start sharing excerpts of the novel I’ve been working on for years now. I’ve been spending a lot of time editing it, really cleaning it up for my beta readers. I know I’ll have even tougher work to do with one of the later chapters that I believe will need a lot of rewriting due to a misguided attempt at a tonal shift that I don’t think paid off in the end.

I’m still working at the hotel. The company is trying to sweeten the position, but . . . well, there’s other prospects that look enticing. Though nothing can beat this job’s usual atmosphere, there comes a time when more than doubling one’s income looks like the better option. But we’ll see.

The Paternal To-do of 2022

Pixabay – Amigos3D

I stretched awake one Monday morning sometime in late September and decided that I’d take the week off to tackle a backlogged to-do list. With the due date of my first child looming on the near horizon, there were things I had to get done before she was born and other things I certainly wouldn’t have time to do once she was here. This list included baby things (washing all of our little girl’s new clothes, reminding my wife to order a breast pump through her insurance, packing my hospital bag, making space in the kitchen cupboards for her baby supplies, installing car seats, etc.) and things not directly about baby (replacing the brakes on my car and getting the radiator flushed plus the interior detailed, reorganizing emergency supplies, figuring out my insurance due to a change of ownership at work, getting the dry cleaning done, scheduling myself an eye exam, taking the dog to the groomers, and having the dog spayed due to a false pregnancy lasting over a month), plus myriad other items I’m not remembering on top of the usual cooking and cleaning, online birthing classes and doctor’s visits, Hello, Author reading, and my relaxing evening book time.

Pixabay – bohed

Luckily, most of the major baby things (like flipping the guest room into a nursery) had been taken care of well before this “week” of to-do list tackling. Nonetheless, that week stretched into over a month. My to-do list not only took me longer to accomplish than I expected, but it seemed to grow with new additions by each Friday’s end. I finally slowed down, finished reading a fantastic western by Oakley Hall, and picked up my book for future dads only to learn that the next thing I’d likely do is tackle any to-do projects I’d been putting off. Apparently this is the paternal version of nesting, and I’d been nesting hard.

Well, that to-do listing last pretty much until the day our daughter was born. And since then, it’s been baby bootcamp. Well, also baby cuddle time.

So, uh, am I ever gonna get back to writing? Perhaps. It’s 2022 and I’ve got the same old things on my plate: write, edit, consider consistently posting to social media. But I’m also looking for a new job. Yes, babies cost a lot of money—so considering a new line of work wasn’t off the table—but my current job provides me with the perfect hours to avoid the need for shipping our bundle of cute and poop off to daycare. My current job is ideal really. Well, it was, until I caught wind of potential position that would more than double my family’s income and provide more or less commensurate hours. Still, I love this job and how darn easy it is. Easy except for when the customers try to kill you.

Yep, you read that right. Easy except for when the customers try to kill you. A guy went after me with a knife last Sunday. Why? Because we were out of hard boiled eggs. He got up in my face and was like What you gonna do about it? I told him I’d make some more (I normally wouldn’t so close to closing, but whatever). Well, instead of waiting for fresh and delicious eggs, he decided to curse at me and the hotel with some very crude language. At this point I told him he had 15 minutes to pack up his room and leave the property. He got quiet then, and a cold countenance turned the previously angry face into a violent nothingness. I started stepping back and watched as a knife flip open in his pocket.

At this point everything happened rather fast. Through some instinct, I contorted my body in a way to keep my soft parts as far from him as possible and had my arms way out in front of me, all the while apparently moving back toward the office door where I could lock myself inside. I also screamed “I’m sorry!” which paused his advance just long enough for me to get inside the door without harm.

The man was crazy. He began crying and giving me a sob story about being homeless for the past three weeks. I did not end up pressing charges so that he could spend his time talking to mental health counselor instead of in jail, which, yes he deserved, but which also wouldn’t have helped him. Yeah, the man needs to not do these kinds of things, but he’ll continue to do them until he gets some sort of mental health help.

Pixabay – teeveesee

If only this wasn’t the only incident in 2021. Since I began this job over seven years ago, I’ve met my fair share of belligerent, crazy, and downright rude people. I’ve also met some super sweet folk. The fact that not only coworkers, but four guests gave gifts when Cora was born proves that there’s more good than bad here. But my life is worth more than $12 an hour. And it wasn’t too many months ago that a guy I told to get packing did pack away everything but his gun. Instead of entering his room when it was evident that he was still in there, I decided to call the police. While I did not know he had a gun, something told me the mother fucker was in there waiting to shoot me. I was right. The first thing the police did when they entered his room was ask him why he was sitting there with a gun. He had his bag ready to go and his gun ready to go off. Yeah, a real nice piece of human trash. Reason I was kicking him out: he was attempting to pick fights with other guests.

I love this place but, if I’m realistic, I could have died over hard boiled eggs. HARD BOILED EGGS. Fuck that. I’m done.

Pixabay – Clker-Free-Vector-Images

So now I have the prospect of a new job plus all the time and energy that goes into raising a baby. But I do intend to get back to writing. I already know I’ll be spending less time than before on my novels and short stories. Not only because of job and baby, but because it’s a new year. It’s 2022 and, if I’m being honest with myself, I’m not the person I want to be. There’s things about myself I want to work on beyond my creative output. And, in fact, I’m putting that first. Because I can’t be happy with me or even with me as a successful writer until those aspects of my potential I haven’t honed are indulged. So I’m going to indulge in myself this year. I’m going to make my baby girl proud to have me as her father. I want the dad she’ll come to known to be a different man than the one I am now.

And I already know this is going to be a great year. My first email of 2022 was an acceptance letter for Bright Moon Over Lover’s Bridge. So let’s celebrate the beginning of this new year with a book and a beverage. Cheers!

Pixabay – succo

Hello Instagram Nights

A change in projects is a new chapter in one’s writing life. A new chapter can even be a return to something left off or set aside. And so my page has turned once again.


Source: Pixabay – Alexas_Fotos

After a year of working on a new novel, it’s time to return to the one I let rest: The Brick.
I’m in an editing phase where I’m both making structural edits and, for parts that don’t need major rewriting, working on cleaning up details and adding better descriptions, all while looking up any questions I had set aside for “later research.” There’ll be even more intentional line-by-line rewriting in a future draft, but first I need all those questions answered and major structural changes to be completed.

Source: Pixabay – Peterdargatz

I’ve also been having fun filming for YouTube, but not so much fun editing videos. It seems that after a couple of crashes where I was forced to reinstall Windows, my computer no longer wants to cooperate when trying to edit videos. The software is the same and the amount of memory available is actually more than pre-crashing, yet there’s all sorts of issues arising that weren’t there before. So what I’m filming is raw and unable to be edited for the moment. Perhaps in the future I’ll get some of these stabs at vlogging edited and up on the internet.

In lieu of YouTubing, I gazed questioningly upon my dormant Instagram account that I had created through my Facebook author page and decided it was time to wake it up. Nope, my few existent Insta posts weren’t done on an app, but from a web browser, using Facebook’s business suite thingy. I’ve had a smartphone for only around a month.

Yes, I finally joined the masses. I started with a used hunk of junk that had belonged to my sister-in-law. It was pretty broken, like I couldn’t hear anyone unless I had them on speakerphone. I got this smartphone for a trip to San Francisco, using it to get San Fran public transportation apps and for a secondary map app (which came in handy when the compass for the map app on my wife’s phone went on the fritz).

And now I have downloaded my first social media app: Instagram.

Image Source pxhere – CC0 Domaine public

M original intention was to advertise my “Hello, Author” interviews on Instagram through crossposting on Facebook.
Turns out Facebook is finicky as fuck about crossposting. Posting to Instagram using FB’s business suite on web browser wasn’t going to work in a headache-free kind of way.

So I got the Instagram app.

And what I’ve discovered is that there’s a huge book-loving and Insta-writing community. I like it. Plus there’s every opportunity to use it as a creative outlet.

So goodbye phone-free days and hello Instagram nights.

COVID poetry

When I was young I filled notebooks full of poems. These days, I don’t write much poetry. But I wrote a poem about dating during the pandemic. This isn’t from personal experience, but observation and extrapolation helped me along.

It’s short and sweet, and I’d appreciate it if you took the time to read it: FOR WHEN NO ONE DOES SOCIAL DISTANCING ANYMORE

Elizabeth Ellen

While I didn’t intend it, I actually published my interview with Elizabeth Ellen on the same day my poem came out.
Normally, I don’t bother making a blog post about the interviews, but since it came out on the same day, I thought I ought to explain. The Junction didn’t say exactly when my story was being posted online to read, so it was just a coincidence that the day I got my Ellen interview up was the same day my poem came out (though the poem must have come out after I got the interview up since I didn’t see anything about “For When No One Does Social Distancing Anymore” until this morning).

We talk about autobiographical fiction, cancel culture, her collection Fast Machine, and her new play Exit Carefully.

Do check out my interview and subscribe to the newsletter too! Thanks a zillion, all you bookworms.

But, yes, it can be scary – terrifying – once the time comes to let the world see your art. Even if, especially if (?) the entire time you were making it you were like, FUCK YOU (middle finger raised) to the world.

Elizabeth Ellen

BOOK REVIEW: Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Unpopular Opinion: Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five is a bad novel. While taste is subjective when it comes to classics of all stripes, I found Slaughterhouse to be littered with problems from start to finish, from form to content. Read the whole book review on Medium.


Also check out my author interviews by signing up at the Hello, Author website.

Sources:
The Slaughterhouse-Five remixed image was used with permission as an Amazon Affiliate.
The book review adjacent image is by Free Photos on Pixabay.

Writer’s Nightmare: My Office Flooded!!!

CLICK TO WATCH

My office flooded. Water came through the wall of a basement shelf in the storage room and streamed into my office. It was a mess that took days and industrial fans to dry. The carpet looked only mildly damp, but the reality I didn’t realize until later was that the matting underneath actually soaked up gallons and gallons of water. Perhaps that’s good, since all of that liquid could have pooled in my office, wreaking even more havoc in my little writerly world.

The office is now set to right, and has been for some time. For whatever reason, this setback kept me from scripting and filming Youtube videos for a while. Before the flooding, I had plans to upload something monthly. Well, months passed, and I hadn’t even uploaded what I’d shot and edited of the deluge. Perhaps it was the flooding combined with the stressors of COVID, the lead-up to the election, the attack on the Capitol, plus personal life issues that made me put off this supplemental project, which is truly just for fun and tangential to my writing. What I didn’t put off was Hello, Author (my author interview newsletter) which I had began working on in early December and launched in January. While it’s also quite fun, Hello, Author also brings immediate value to the writing community and those whom I interview. And that’s more important to me than making videos for myself.

But if you’re interested in seeing what I’ll be creating (I’m a newbie, so please be forgiving!), do check out the video, liking and subscribing while you’re there. Future videos will include monologues, writing vlogs, my publication journey, and dramatic readings of my work. And who knows what else. Once I get going, I’m sure the ideas will stream forth like water from my basement wall.

Thanks for reading my blog and watching my Youtube videos. Keep it creative, Bookworms.

Launching the Hello, Author newsletter



I’ve been working hard to create something for the benefit of the reading and writing communities I interact with. The fruit of these efforts launches officially today. “Hello, Author” is my new newsletter of author interviews.


Sign up so you don’t miss any of the interviews. The full archive can also be accessed on the Hello, Author website.


The first author interview is with Gary Floyd, author of Liberté: The Days of Rage 1990-2020 and Eyes Open With Your Mask On. I began my newsletter with Gary because his books are not only topical, but relatable.

I also want to thank everyone who follows here and elsewhere, everyone who reads my work, everyone who cares about what I write. Hopefully this endeavor works as a way to give a little something back to all of you. ❤️ 📕 ❤️