Interview with IndieReader

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IndieReader, a company run by authors and writers for authors and writers, did a great interview with me. They previously did a review of my book you should check out too. It’s a 4+ Star review well worth the read. The interview is linked below.

Check it out here: Randal Eldon Greene, an All About the Book Gust Author Interview.
Randal Eldon Greene's Literary Fiction novel, Descriptions of Heaven published by Harvard Square Editions, is awarded the IndieReader Approved sticker.

About the interviewer: since IndieReader’s launch in 2009, they have reviewed thousands of self-published titles. They offer a variety of publishing services to help promote and improve the quality of independently published titles. As a twice traditionally published author herself, Amy Edelman, founder of IR, knows exactly what it takes for an indie title to not just succeed, but also to stand out from the pack.


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Personal Update

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When I accepted the opportunity to have Descriptions of Heaven published by Harvard Square Editions (rejecting two other small press publishers who wanted the rights to print the manuscript) I set aside a new novel I was working on at the time. I set it aside so I could devote my full attention to, at first, editing my debut and, later, marketing my book.

After Descriptions of Heaven came out, I wrote the first drafts to half a dozen short stories or so. As I like to say, all these story ideas were backed up, blocking the creative pipeline. That pipeline is a little clearer now, and I’ve begun work on my novel-in-progress again.

I’ve been working on the novel in the new library. The old library was one of the small bedrooms and did have the advantage of a small balcony where one could enjoy a book and a view. However, long-term plans finally reached fruition when my best friend, Mike Convery, moved in. I believe he owns more books than I do. So, Libby and I moved out of our large bedroom and into a smaller room, which had until then functioned as an office. I rather like our new space. It’s cozy and, for some reason, I sleep much better there (my love of tight spaces perhaps?). There’s an entrance to an attic bedroom too from the new library. Since Libs and I gave the room over to a communal space, it opened that bedroom up for her sister to move into last month, just in time for Abby to begin her first year of college classes here in Sioux City.

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My writing desk is now located in the library since there’s now no dedicated office space. I must say I don’t mind writing while surrounded by all our books (sans those piled in our respective bedrooms, plus a sole bookcase—built by my great grandfather—that sits in the living room, filled with matching hardcover classics).

As some of you know, I spent most of my summer writing at the Blue Cafe. I will admit, between sorting and shelving books, vacationing with an artist friend in Virginia, and a belated honeymoon with my wife, I did not make it much to the cafe during the months of July and August.
Sept7writingdeskAnd, as you can see, my desk is lined with post-it notes. They’re organized and essential to have for reference while writing my novel. I simply cannot take all the notes with me to the cafe. If I wrote my first draft on a computer rather than by hand (the pile of paper on the left is the hand-written manuscript) I could use the sticky notes function. However, there’s another reason that I must write here at the desk: the cafe is open only three hours during the day. Yes, I spent most of my summer writing short stories during a measly three hours. With so little time actually writing, I found myself editing at home, reading on the porch, and going on frequent walks and picnics with my new wife—all time spent well in my opinion.

But now it’s crunch time. I’m back to writing from morning until early afternoon, usually six hours (including a short lunch). The first thing I am doing is reading through what I’ve written. I have about seven chapters typed up. I’m now reading through those chapters, doing light editing as I go. At the time of composing this blog, I’m in the middle of chapter 4.

Ah, but what about those short stories? Will they be seeing themselves in print soon?
To answer that question, I’ll say that I still plan to go to the Blue Cafe once a week. You’ll find me there on Thursdays (the only weekday Mike works, which leaves me a little too lonely—I work best in a “studio setting” with the presence of others nearby). At the cafe I intend to work on my short fiction and other non-novel writing, submitting it and editing it, maybe even writing new stories should the impulse to compose be strong enough.

Some days I will also spend time on other writing-related work. But not every day. As much as I like the fantasy of a hermetic life of writing, my reality is that I have a lot more in my life to fill up my time. I write, yes, but I also do most of the household cooking, take on the major cleaning projects, keep the houseplants alive, and am essential to shopping excursions. I am a bit of a den mother—even the new members of the household have that figured out already.

I’d rather my plate be emptied of some of these duties (essentially the cleaning, as I do love cooking), that way I’d have more time for reading and studying. But, really, I don’t have any concrete complaints. My new roommates have picked up some of the chores. My cooking is now appreciated by more than just Libby and myself. I’ve found I have plenty of time for great conversations with Mike that only supplement my enjoyment of art and books. Somewhere along the line about an hour a day has opened up for me to begin studying Latin again—which is a joy for me because I’m not a natural when it comes to languages, and I love the mental challenge.

So things are going well. They’re going great. I have more time than ever to work, learn, and play. My house is full of people I love. My blind dog has more sets of hands to pet her than ever before. And my next novel is well under way.
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Interview with Dan Bloom

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Cli-fi guru Dan Brown conducted an interview with me for his all things climate fiction portal.

Check it out here: An interview with novelist R.E. Greene, author of the novella ”DESCRIPTIONS OF HEAVEN”

DanBloomAbout the interviewer: Born and raised in Massachusetts, currently in Taiwan, Dan Bloom is a 1971 graduate of Tufts University in Boston where he majored in post-modern European literature. He also attended Oregon State University where he worked on a masters degree in the Speech and Communications Department. Dan worked as a journalist in Alaska for 12 years in the 1970s and 1980s, and later as a newspaper editor and reporter at English-language newspapers in Japan and Taiwan.  He tweets @verywindycities and manages cli-fi.net.
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Blue Cafe – Photos

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On May 18th I did a reading and book signing at Sioux City’s Blue Cafe. The owner, Gia Emory, told me that we packed the house.

0518TenieshaTeniesha Kessler was our featured poet, giving us a variety of poemswild, weird, and wonderful.

One of my best friends in the world, Chris Larson, provided us with some classy piano jazz both before and after the reading portion of the evening.

0518RandalthruFlowersWhile Chris played his tunes for us, I got to sit on stage and sign books.

I read stories, poems, and even a bit of creative non-fiction about my blind little pooch, Missy.

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Of course I read from Descriptions of Heaven too.

Sara, one of my oldest friends going way back to our elementary school days, was awesome enough to drive several hours just to see me read. #FanGirl  😀 0518EmoryStudio
Blue Cafe also houses the music studio of Ron Emory from T.S.O.L. He couldn’t make it to the show, grieving the death of his good friend, Chris Cornell of Soundgarden and Audioslave. I did see Ron earlier in the day and was able to wish him an early “happy birthday.” (Cool fact: we share a May 20th birthday).

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My wife Libby and I having our photo taken after the show.

We were also celebrating my birthday that night. Gia surprised the patrons with free cake I had her make for the occasion. Afterward, some of us went out for drinks at the nearby Diving Elk. My gorgeous wife got herself an old fashion, and I had a couple of tasty dark beers in celebration.

My First Book Signing [Photos]

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My first book signing was held on April 22 at the Sioux City Barnes & Noble. And it was amazing. A ton of friends and family came out to support me; many of them who had been waiting for just such a signing stopped by and got themselves a signed copy of Descriptions of Heaven. I was both surprised and pleased by how many fans showed up. Here’s a big THANK YOU to each and every one of you.

The [PHOTOS]

And a couple snapshots from a visit to the bookstore just a few days later.

Swing by BN.Com and get your copy today.
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Reading & Book Signing at Blue Cafe

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Join us May 18th for a reading from local Sioux City author Randal Eldon Greene. He will be joined by Omaha poet Teniesha Kessler. Party starts at 5:00pm and ends at 9:00pm with the piano jazz stylizations of Chris Larson and Ben Lunn. Copies of Randal’s novel, Descriptions of Heaven, will be on sale for $20.

Event: Reading, Book Signing, and Jazz
Date: 05-18-2017
Location: Blue Cafe, 1301 Pierce St, Sioux City Iowa
Time: 5:00-9:00pm
No need to RSVP, but you may let us know if you plan to go through this Facebook Event.

Navigate to the Events Page
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Interview with Scott Mullins

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Freelance writer and digital content manager Scott Mullins did an interview with me for the This is Writing website, a great resource for authors and readers alike.

Check it out here: Author Interview with Literary Fiction Author Randal Eldon Greene

scottmullinsAbout the interviewer: Scott Mullins is a writer, editor, aspiring novelist, and social media nerd. He works with online content in a wide range of styles—from technical articles, content marketing, and product write-ups to blogs and social media.
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On the Art of the Long Sentence

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I love the long sentence. So much so that I wrote an essay about artful long sentences (not to be confused with the run-on sentence).

You can find the essay published on the This is Writing website. Much thanks to Scott Mullins for taking this project on (oh, and for conducting an interview with me, which will appear on the website at a later date).

Click here to read the essay.
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